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Feb 26, 2019 | Touch Of Thoughts

Subjective Thoughts on Human Rights Agenda

By Catherine Forson Agbo
Subjective Thoughts on Human Rights Agenda

Many trusts that worldwide human rights law is one of our most noteworthy moral accomplishments as people are totally protected in terms of security, food, and protection. But is that the case? Why do we still have people suffering, and in lack of good standards of living? In any case, there is little proof international human right is successful. When deciphering the right to nationality as a human right, one must consider that issues of nationality fall inside the domestic jurisdiction of states.

In principle, no human individual ought to be rendered stateless: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights stipulates that the right to have or change citizenship can't be denied. In all actuality, human rights law has neglected to achieve its goals. There is little proof that human rights treaties, in general, have improved the prosperity and wellbeing of people within a state.

There is more to human right than just casting a vote. How many people in Ghana are aware of their right? What is the media doing about the situation? It is not surprising that those in power prefer people to be illiterate when it comes to their rights in order to remain in power. Human rights are supposed to be exercised and not left as decorations stand in front of one house.

When we look at the Ghanaian and other African community, it appears that the human rights agenda has fallen on hard times. In much of the Islamic world, women lack equality, religious dissenters are oppressed and political freedoms are abridged. The conventional heroes of human rights – Europe and the United States – have wallowed when you take a gander at the battled with a sovereign debt crisis and xenophobia towards its Muslim people. An ongoing report gauges that about 30 million individuals are constrained without wanting to work. If they do not work, they cannot enjoy certain amenities of the state. Is that Human right?

We live in an age in which most of the major human rights have been endorsed by far most nations. People are not happy in the country because they keep falling into the cold arms of deceit, fraud and evil works. Human right is for all, the right to privacy, the right to even life is ours to exercise. The first way to prevent human rights violation is adequate knowledge of human rights. There is a need for the media to properly inform the general public of their rights and how they can seek redress when these rights are violated.

Credit:
www.humanrights.gov.au supported.

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