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09.05.2012 General News

Judge Raises Red Flag Over Methamphetamine

By Daily Graphic
Judge Raises Red Flag Over Methamphetamine
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A High Court Judge on Wednesday raised red flag over attempts to export Methamphetamine out of Ghana to other countries saying drug couriers are now swaying towards its exportation.

Justice Charles Quist said because couriers had observed that the exportation of methamphetamine attracted less punishment they were now shifting towards that.

In Ghana, the exportation of methamphetamine could attract a fine, conviction or both.

He made the observation when three people, Aminatu Mohammed 25, Ahmed B. Afegah 26, and Mumuni Abubakari, 27, appeared before him for attempted exportation of methamphetamine to Singapore without registering them with the Food and Drugs Board.

Justice Quist pointed out that the accused persons could have been executed if they were apprehended in Singapore.

They had pleaded guilty to the charges and were fined GH¢ 6,000 each or in default serve 12 months imprisonment each.

In addition, each would sign a bond to be of good behaviour for two years.

The court ordered that the drugs be destroyed by operatives of the Narcotics Control Board (NACOB) in the presence of the Court’s Registrar.

The prosecutor, Mr Asiamah Sampong, Principal State Attorney told the court that on November 9, 2011, operatives of the NACOB accosted Aminatu at the Kotoka International Airport (KIA) while she was going through boarding formalities to Dubai enroute to Singapore.

Mr Sampong said when a search was conducted on Aminatu’s two travelling bags, 4,855 grammes of methamphetamine were found in false compartments.

When she was quizzed, Aminatu said it was Musa who procured her the two bags and passports to send them to an unknown person in Singapore.

In the case of Afegah, he was found with four parcels of methamphetamine weighing 4,794 grammes on November 9, 2011 at KIA.

The drugs were found concealed in false compartments of his bags and he said it was one Sherif who gave him the drugs to be delivered to an unknown person in Singapore.

Abubakari was found with 4,789 grammes of methamphetamine in a false compartment of his travelling bag. He also indicated that he was to deliver it to someone in Singapore.

Mr James Agalga, who represented the three convicts, prayed the court to temper justice with mercy as they had been incarceration for some months and had learnt their lesson during the period.

Methamphetamine is a white, odourless, bitter-tasting crystalline powder that easily dissolves in water or alcohol and is taken orally, intranasally (snorting the powder), by needle injection, or by smoking.

Chronic methamphetamine abuse significantly changes how the brain functions.

Repeated methamphetamine abuse can also lead to addiction—a chronic, relapsing disease characterised by compulsive drug seeking and use, which is accompanied by chemical and molecular changes in the brain.

GNA

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