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Science & Environment | Jan 20, 2005

Nuclear Science should be made beneficial to society -Kufuor

GNA

Accra, Jan. 20, GNA - President John Agyekum Kufuor on Thursday appealed to Nuclear Scientists to demystify their research and make them beneficial to society.

He said the Government would offer the needed assistance to encourage Ghanaian Nuclear Scientists to lead in the realization of the benefits, adding, " we might reap some affordable benefits to society."

President Kufuor made the appeal when Dr Mohammed El-Baradei, Director-General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), on a three-day visit to Ghana paid a courtesy call on him at the Castle, Osu.

He said, not much was known about the research findings and benefits of Nuclear Science "which is shrouded in secrecy and known to be only for mass destruction" and the Government would co-operate with the IAEA to establish more research centres for the benefit of the country.

"The Government will support Ghanaian Nuclear Scientists for the country to be within the brackets of Nuclear Science a major component in crops research and water management", he added.

Dr El-Baradei said Nuclear Science did not only involve in production of weapons for destruction but for diagnosis of diseases that affect mankind.

He stressed the need for people to understand their operations to appreciate Nuclear Science.

Dr El-Baradei said the IAEA was known to be involved in human resources development and currently had date on the options Nuclear Science had for society and would continue to make the options available.

The Director-General of IAEA who is visiting West Africa for the first time would participate in the official inauguration of a Radiotherapy Centre at the Komfo Anokye Hospital in Kumasi.

Earlier in the day, Dr El-Baradei held high-level consultations with top-level Ministers of State and other Government officials. The Vienna-based IAEA provided the equipment, training and expert services through the Ghana Atomic Energy Agency (GAEA) for the establishment of the two radiotherapy centres at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital and the new one to be inaugurated in Kumasi.

Ghana was the third country from Africa, south of the Sahara to become a member of the IAEA in September 1960 and she has since benefited from the Agency's Technical Cooperation projects, including financial support of more than 123 million dollars.

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