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18.03.2004 Education

Director of Education bemoans state of education in two communities

By GNA

Kyekyewere (Ash), March 18, GNA - Mrs Gladys Asamani, Bosomtwe-Atwima-Kwanwoma District Director of Education, has bemoaned the refusal of parents at Kyekyewere and Bokwame to send their children to school.

She expressed surprise at parents who allowed their children to migrate to Kumasi and the other urban centres to sell iced water instead of attending school.

Addressing the chiefs and people of Kyekyewere as part of her familiarisation tour of the town on Wednesday, Mrs Asamani reminded them that education was the bedrock for the development of every country and that the best legacy parents could bequeath to their children was to educate them well.

She pointed out that since the present children were the future leaders of the country, if they were denied education, then the country had no future since it would be full of illiterates who could not help with its proper development.

Mrs Asamani, therefore, called for the establishment of child panel committees in the two communities to help check any rift between parents and their children in the area of education.

The District Education Director told them that the law would soon catch up with parents, who shirked their responsibility of sending their children to school and those who also refused to provide their children in school with their needs when the Free Compulsory Universal Basic Education (FCUBE) becomes fully operational.

The Very Reverend S.A. Amankwaa, the Superintendent Minister in-charge of the Santasi Methodist Circuit, who oversees the area, asked parents to desist from attacking teachers and said the church would henceforth collaborate with all stakeholders in the community to improve upon education in the area.

Nana Boakye Ababio, Chief of Kyekyewere, attributed the poor standard of education in the town to broken homes, which had made most parents single and unable to shoulder the responsibility educating their children.

At Bokwame, Mrs Asamani lauded the people for building an office for the primary school but expressed regret about the poor enrolment, which stood at 112 pupils from primary one to six. She promised to send teachers to the town to augment the present strength of teachers on condition that the enrolment would improve.

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