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04.03.2024 Education

I'm not happy with government's management of basic schools curriculum reforms — Kofi Asare

Kofi Asare, Executive Director of the Africa Education WatchKofi Asare, Executive Director of the Africa Education Watch
04.03.2024 LISTEN

The Executive Director of the Africa Education Watch, Kofi Asare has criticized government's management of reforms to the basic school curriculum.

In a post on Facebook on Monday, March 4, Mr. Asare expressed unhappiness at how the rollout of the new curriculum has been handled.

When Computing was introduced as a compulsory standalone subject at the basic level in 2018, the Ministry of Education was aware that all public basic schools would require functioning computer laboratories and a tutor to effectively teach the subject, according to Mr. Asare.

However, the necessary resources and infrastructure, according to the education advocate, were not provided to schools across the country.

As a result, over 60% of schools have had to teach Computing in a theoretical manner without access to computers or textbooks in junior high school.

Mr. Asare argues that expecting only schools with existing computer facilities to benefit from the curriculum reforms is inequitable and fails to leave no child behind.

He noted: "Every Ghanaian child, regardless of their geography or economic status deserves quality digital literacy at the basic level."

The inadequate rollout of the reforms means that an estimated 70% of children aged 6-14 in northern Ghana who have never used a computer before will fall behind in Computing.

Read his full post below:
ORGANIZATION DECIDES EVERYTHING-NKRUMAH
I know many are concerned Computing will not be compulsorily examined at BECE 2024; but it is fair to excluded children.

By 2018, the Ministry of Education knew that after making Computing a standalone compulsory subject at the basic level, all public basic schools required functioning computer laboratories and a tutor to give effect.

This ain’t rocket science.
Functioning computer laboratories with internet and coding facilities are basic in the urban private schools our kids and those of our leaders attend.

Every Ghanaian child, regardless of their geography or economic status deserves quality digital literacy at the basic level.

Knowing this, we did nothing, expecting only the few schools with functioning computer laboratories to benefit fully from that curriculum, while over 60% of schools taught computing on the blackboard; without even textbooks in JHS.

What future are we carving for the 70% of children aged 6-14 in the north who have never used a computer?

Is this how to build an equitable education system?

I am not happy at all with the way the government has managed this basic school curriculum reforms.

Until every school has functioning computers to teach Computing, it will be unconscionable and unfair to make it compulsory at BECE-Leave no one behind!

Too much talk, poor organization with very little action.

Organization decides everything-Kwame Nkrumah

Isaac Donkor Distinguished
Isaac Donkor Distinguished

News ReporterPage: IsaacDonkorDistinguished

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