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12.01.2007 General News

Weija Leprosarium Appeals For Aid

By Stephen K.Effah
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INMATES of the Weija Leprosarium in Accra have appealed for financial support for their children’s education and enrolment into various apprenticeships.
They noted that most of their children who have completed junior secondary school could not continue to senior secondary school because of their inability to pay their fees or enroll them into apprenticeships.
A spokesperson of the inmates, Gladys Adobea, who made the appeal in Accra yesterday, explained that the inmates do not have the strength to work and earn money to support their children’s education.
She made the appeal at a ceremony at which the Silent Ten Social Club, a group of Ga residents in North London, donated various items including bags of rice, boxes of soap, tins of milk, gallons of cooking oil, bags of used clothing and crates of eggs worth ¢50 million to the inmates.
Ms Addobea said the Tulsi Trust, an Indian Group are those who have been taking care of their younger children adding, 'supporting our children’s education or enrolling them into an apprenticeship would help them to be meaningful citizens in the future'.
She said last year, a group of students from the University of Ghana, taught them how to do tie and dye designs which they were doing for sale until the last two weeks as a result of water shortage at the centre.
She said that although there are a lot of materials available for production, the lack of water in the past two weeks from the Ghana Water Company had bedeviled their production.
Ms Addobea thanked the government for the increasing of their feeding fee from ¢1,200 to ¢6,000 last year and extended special commendation to Reverend Father Campbell for his immense support to the Leprosarium.
The President of the club, Ray Ankrah, said the donation was to demonstrate the club’s support and solidarity with the inmates saying, 'Very often, people like these are forgotten in society'.

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