ModernGhanalogo

FEATURED: Ghana Back To Hipc Not True – Oppong Nkrumah...

body-container-line-1

How To: Tie a tie

By askmen.com
Listen to article


What you need to know
•The most traditional tie knot is called the Windsor.

•The easiest, most casual tie knot is the Four-in-Hand.

•As a man, you should know how to tie a tie.
When it comes to tie-tying, most of guys are one-dimensional at best. Some guys mastered the art of a single knot a long time ago, and then left well enough alone; those of us who seldom wear ties either leave the thing tied or rely on a clip. And not that any of this is right or wrong, but as men, especially well-dressed men, we should possess the practical skills of learning how to tie a tie and creating various tie knots. It's not a “one-knot-fits-all” world we live in. So, in an attempt to increase your tie-tying acumen, here is a quick look at how to tie a tie and achieve four of the most popular knots.

Windsor
The granddaddy of them all, the Windsor is the most traditional knot and is the first one to master. It creates a hefty, professional-looking knot, meaning that it works best for any occasion when you want to look completely respectable.

1. Place the tie around your shoulders, top-side up, with the fat end hanging roughly a foot lower than the skinny end.

2. Cross the fat portion over the skinny end to make an X fairly close to your neck (around the second shirt button).

3. Loop the fat end underneath the thin end and up through the neck loop. Drop it down so that it overlaps the thin end again.

4. Pull the fat end behind the bundle of cloth you've created (your first step toward the final knot) to the left. Pull it up and drop it down through the neck loop again, then pull it to the left again.

5. Pull the fat end over from left to right, overlapping your evolving knot.

6. Pull the fat end up through the loop again, behind what now looks like a nearly complete knot.

7. Bring the fat end back down and insert it through the knot.

8. Finish your knot by tightening it. In doing so, you will see the beginnings of a natural dimple form. Manipulate it manually to make this dimple as distinct as possible. Its purpose is to add depth to an otherwise flat, bland-surfaced tie, and concurrently to mark you as a man of style. You will never leave the house without a dimple in your tie again.

Half-Windsor
In the same vein as the Windsor, the Half-Windsor enjoys a professional prestige and polished reputation. However, it's not quite as bulky, which makes it a better option for narrower collars and softer shirts.

1. Place the tie around your shoulders, top-side up, with the fat end hanging roughly a foot lower than the skinny end.

2. Cross the fat portion over the skinny end to make an X fairly close to your neck (around the second shirt button).

3. Pull the fat end behind the thin end to the right, then up in front of it and down through the neck loop.

4. Pull the fat end over from right to left, overlapping your evolving knot.

5. Pull the fat end up through the loop again, behind what now looks like a nearly complete knot.

6. Bring the fat end back down and insert it through the knot.

7. Finish your knot by tightening it; again, accentuate that dimple.

Four-in-Hand
Looking for a knot with little time investment and less pretension? The Four-in-Hand is all yours. It's an on-the-go knot that works with both casual looks and narrow collars. When it comes to learning about how to tie a tie, this one's the easiest to master.

1. Place the tie around your shoulders, top-side up, with the fat end hanging roughly a foot lower than the skinny end.

2. Cross the fat portion over the skinny end to make an X fairly close to your neck (around the second shirt button).

Wrap the fat end around the thin end, then up through the neck loop. Drop the fat end back down and through the knot.

3. Finish your knot by tightening it. Note that the dimple is much harder to produce on this kind of knot and may prove entirely elusive.

Pratt
The Pratt is that well-rounded knot most guys will depend on religiously. Its symmetrical look and less complicated construction deem the Pratt the most universal knot that goes with any dress shirt.

1. Place the tie around your neck upside down (with the seams facing outward). Note that the fat end should be hanging lower than the thin end.

2. Cross the two ends over to form an X and flip the fat end up and through the loop to form a knot around the smaller end.

3. Pull both ends apart quite tightly to ensure your knot is snug, then bring the fat end of the tie over the thin end to cover your first knot.

4. Pull the fat end up and through the loop, then drop it down through the knot.

5. Tighten and dimple up.
All tied up
In a complicated world, no one wants more responsibility and more work. But when it comes to fashion -- and most definitely the tie knot -- going the extra mile can really pay off. Sure, that solitary knot you've relied on for years may get the job done, but it may do so counterproductively. So study up and practice hard: Show the world you know how to tie a tie.






Powered By Modern Ghana
body-container-line