Government compensates farmers affected by Bui Dam

By GNA
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By GNA

4/5/2012 9:02:12 PM -

The government has paid a total amount of GH¢1,225,630 to farmers who were directly affected by the construction of the Bui Dam in Tain, Brong Ahafo region.

Acres of economic trees and crops belonging to 580 farmers at Bui and its environs were cleared to pave way for the construction of the dam, which is about 80 per cent complete.

The beneficiary farmers are from Brewohodi, Dokokyina, Jama, Resettlement Sites, Bui, Ankanyakrom, Agbegikrom and Bator. Mr. Joachim Desewu, Head of Finance of the Land Valuation Division (LVD) of the Lands Commission on the behalf of the government presented the cheques to the farmers at separate meetings in the communities.

He said it would take a longer time for the government to pay land compensation as large acres of land were affected by the project. Mr. Desewu explained that the enumeration on the economic trees and crops was done by the LVD in 2010 after taking inventory of the various farmlands within the project area.

He said supplementary valuation was done in the first quarter of 2011 in order to capture farmers who might have been absent from the initial inventory taking due to one reason or the other.

This process included verification of farmlands and also settling of disputes arising from ownership of the farms, Mr. Desewu explained. He said the government was yet to effect compensation payments to farmers whose farmlands were also destroyed in the construction of the power lines to the dam site and urged affected farmers to exercise patience.


A man should be so selfless that if God ask him to write his destiny he will write it for him.
By: MOHAMMED MUBASHIRU

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